Narrating the past, narrating the nation: The rhetoric of Holocaust Memorial Day in Poland and Britain

University of Loughborough

Project summary

This six-month primary research project, analyses contemporary Holocaust commemoration in Poland and Britain. The British Principle Investigator and Polish co-Investigator will attend the national Holocaust commemoration ceremonies in January 2019; we will analyse the contents of these ceremonies, particularly the historic narratives presented, and what they reveal about shared (national) values. This data will be supplemented and contextualised through interviews conducted with British and Polish stakeholders in Holocaust commemoration. This is a new initiative; the target audiences are academic and heritage industries; results will be disseminated in both academic and popular publications, and academic conferences.

Staff

Principal Investigator
Professor John E. Richardson

A Reader in Critical Discourse Studies, Department of Social Sciences, Loughborough University. His research interests include structured social inequalities, British fascism, racism, critical discourse studies, rhetoric and argumentation and commemorative discourse. His publications include: the books, Analysing Journalism (2007), Analysing Fascist Discourse: European fascism in talk and text (2013, co-edited with Ruth Wodak), Cultures of Post-War British Fascism (2015, co-edited with Nigel Copsey), British Fascism: A Discourse-Historic Analysis (2017, ibidem-Verlag) and the Routledge Handbook of Critical Discourse Studies (2017, co-edited with John Flowerdew); and academic articles on critical discourse studies, commemorative discourse, newspaper representations of Muslims, balance and impartiality in BBC reporting of Israel/Palestine, argumentation in readers’ letters, political communications and party political discourse. He is Editor of the international journal Critical Discourse Studies, co-editor of Bloomsbury book series Advances in Critical Discourse Studies and is on the editorial boards of various journals. From February 2017-January 2018 he was a Leverhulme Trust Research Fellow, researching the ways that Holocaust Memorial Day in the UK has changed since 2002.

Co-investigator
Daniel Tilles

Assistant professor of history at the Pedagogical University of Krakow, Poland. He completed his doctorate at Royal Holloway, University of London under the supervision of the late Professor David Cesarani. His research has focused on fascist, anti-fascist and Jewish history, in particular in the interwar period. His most recent book is British Fascism Antisemitism and Jewish Responses, 1932-40 (Bloomsbury, 2015) and he is co-editor of Fascism and the Jews: Italy and Britain (Vallentine Mitchell, 2011).